Wednesday, September 08, 2010

Need to Know

Lucy, there is nothing you need
to know about me. Keep dreaming
your British Empire dreams.
Keep believing you are safe,
even as I stand here, watching
you sleep.
                Your dreams will soon turn
to nightmares, if I stay too long
before our caress. It will not hurt.
If only you knew how delicious
you are, the iron bite of your blood
softened by the sweetness
of your soul.
                   There is one thing
you will know. You are mine forever.

* * * * *

This poem was written in response to the "Need to Know" prompt at We Write Poems.

I have been completely unsuccessful at posting a link to my poem over at We Write Poems.  It's always worked before.  I must be doing something wrong, but for the life of me, I can't figure out what it is.  My browser did crash while I was on the site, and my laptop shut down and restarted, so I figured that fixed the problem.  Maybe it didn't.  I hope people will find my poem.

7 comments:

  1. an awesome write, if a bit frightening - she's probably better off not knowing... or is she? what about the nightmares, with no apparent cause?

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  2. Thanks, gospelwriter. It was supposed to be scary. I'll have to think about the nightmares and what's causing them - I have an idea in mind, but perhaps I need to provide another hint in the poem.

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  3. There's something overwrought and understated about the narrator. The ending blew me away. I enjoyed reading your work Mr Walker.

    I'm glad I found your poem.

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  4. irenet23, thank you for commenting on my poem. I'm glad you found it and enjoyed reading it.

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  5. Irene, thank you so very much for posting a link for me at We Write Poems. I don't know why it won't work for me. I'm truly grateful; that was very kind of you.

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  6. Part fascination, part gruesome. I reckon we need to know more!

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  7. Thanks, Derrick. It appears I didn't give enough hints that people could guess who the narrator is, and yet the poem seems to work without knowing who it is.

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